Jan. 22nd, 2015

giandujakiss: (Default)
via LGM, here's an interview with Björk:
Pitchfork: When it was originally misreported that Vulnicura was produced by Arca, instead of co-produced by you and Arca, it reminded me of the Joni Mitchell quote from the height of her fame about how whichever man was in the room with her got credit for her genius.

B: Yeah, I didn’t want to talk about that kind of thing for 10 years, but then I thought, “You’re a coward if you don’t stand up. Not for you, but for women. Say something.” So around 2006, I put something on my website where I cleared something up, because it’d been online so many times that it was becoming a fact. It wasn’t just one journalist getting it wrong, everybody was getting it wrong. I’ve done music for, what, 30 years? I’ve been in the studio since I was 11; Alejandro had never done an album when I worked with him. He wanted to putting something on his own Twitter, just to say it’s co-produced. I said, “No, we’re never going to win this battle. Let’s just leave it.” But he insisted. I’ve sometimes thought about releasing a map of all my albums and just making it clear who did what. But it always comes across as so defensive that, like, it’s pathetic. I could obviously talk about this for a long time. [laughs]

Pitchfork: The world has a difficult time with the female auteur.

B: I have nothing against Kanye West. Help me with this—I’m not dissing him—this is about how people talk about him. With the last album he did, he got all the best beatmakers on the planet at the time to make beats for him. A lot of the time, he wasn’t even there. Yet no one would question his authorship for a second. If whatever I’m saying to you now helps women, I’m up for saying it. For example, I did 80% of the beats on Vespertine and it took me three years to work on that album, because it was all microbeats—it was like doing a huge embroidery piece. Matmos came in the last two weeks and added percussion on top of the songs, but they didn’t do any of the main parts, and they are credited everywhere as having done the whole album. [Matmos’] Drew [Daniel] is a close friend of mine, and in every single interview he did, he corrected it. And they don’t even listen to him. It really is strange.

Pitchfork: How does it make you feel when this happens now?

B: I have to say—I got a feeling I am going to win in the long run, but I want to be part of the zeitgeist, too. I want to support young girls who are in their 20s now and tell them: You’re not just imagining things. It’s tough. Everything that a guy says once, you have to say five times. Girls now are also faced with different problems. I’ve been guilty of one thing: After being the only girl in bands for 10 years, I learned—the hard way—that if I was going to get my ideas through, I was going to have to pretend that they—men—had the ideas. I became really good at this and I don’t even notice it myself. I don’t really have an ego. I’m not that bothered. I just want the whole thing to be good. And I’m not saying one bad thing about the guys who were with me in the bands, because they’re all amazing and creative, and they’re doing incredible things now. But I come from a generation where that was the only way to get things done. So I have to play stupid and just do everything with five times the amount of energy, and then it will come through.

.... I learned what a lot of women have to do is make the guys in the room think it was their idea, and then you back them up.

QOTD

Jan. 22nd, 2015 10:45 am
giandujakiss: (Default)
Week one, we had a speaker election that did not go as well as a lot of us would have liked. Week two, we got into a big fight over deporting children, something that a lot of us didn't want to have a discussion about. Week three, we are now talking about rape and incest and reportable rapes and incest for minors. … I just can't wait for week four.
-- Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA), describing the conduct of the new Republican House caucus.
giandujakiss: (Default)
but here are my general observations.

Male protagonists are permitted to go on violent sprees to avenge the harms inflicted on female loved ones, but not on themselves. They often may have endured horrible tortures personally, but their violent vendettas are rooted in harms to women who they must protect.

Villains, however, frequently base their vendettas on harms to themselves, rather than loved ones. Silva in Skyfall, or Lex Luthor in some Superman versions, are examples. It is a sign of vanity and weakness if one goes on a vendetta to avenge harms done to one's own person.

Unless you are a woman, because female protagonists - unlike male protagonists - are permitted to avenge themselves. Which I take to be a subtle suggestion that women are expected to be vainer and more self-centered than men.

Generally, when heroes - male or female - avenge others, those others are female. Both women and men may avenge mothers, female lovers, daughters, female friends, sisters - but not men. Presumably, this is because women are viewed as uniquely vulnerable and helpless; men are expected to care for themselves, and so harms done to them, while tragic, are not worthy of vengeance by heroes (though they might be by villains).

There are exceptions - I can think of several off the top of my head. Khan avenged his wife; Maggie Q's Nikita avenged her male fiance. Emily Thorne/Amanda Clarke is sort of avenging her father, although she's also largely avenging herself so I'm not sure how much that counts. Nonetheless, I believe these are decently accurate general rules.

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  12 3 45
6789101112
1314 1516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 21st, 2017 10:09 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios